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Classifying problems on piece count and mate types

 
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mrmip
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Location: Finland

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2014 7:49 am    Post subject: Classifying problems on piece count and mate types Reply with quote

One way to classify compositions is to look at the piece count.
This is a kind of 'Economy of Smallness' meaning the less pieces you need to
express an idea, the better your work is.

*If black has only a lone king, the problem is called Rex Solus.
(If white has only a lone king the problem is busted )

*If white has only one piece in addition of the king, we call it Minimal problem.

*If the total number of pieces is four (4), then we have a Miniproblem or Wenigsteiner.

*If the total number of pieces is seven (7) or less, the problem is a Miniatyre.

*Finally if the piececount is 8-12, the problem is known as a Meredith.
(Based on the preference of composer William Meredith 1835-1903 )


What about classifying problems based on different mates?

You would think that a mate is a mate is a mate.
Not so in the world of chessproblems: 'Mates are not created equal.'

* A mate involving all white officers (king excepted) is called an economical mate.

* A mate, where each square around the king is taken only in one way is called a pure mate.
Each such square is either controlled by one of the opponent's men or blocked by an own man.
If a blocking piece is pinned and without pin there is no mate, then the mate is still
considered pure and the pinning piece is involved in such mate.

* A mate that is pure and economical is known as a model mate.
* A model mate involving all men in the board (white and black) is called an ideal mate.

There is a school of thought, called Bohemians, that emphasizes the use of model mates in the compositions.
You could say that they prefer 'the form over content' in a chess problem. These Bohemian type compositions tend to be light (airy) with multiple model mates in variations.

One typical example from a recognized champion of the school is given below.

Miroslav Havel, 1900



2#

Note the different modelmates after black king moves.
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